Home > Islam, Quran, Uncategorized > Opening Chapter of Holy Quran, Surah Fatiha.

Opening Chapter of Holy Quran, Surah Fatiha.


1:1 In The Name of Allah, The All-Merciful, The Ever-Merciful.  1:2 Praise be to Allah, The Lord of the worlds.

1:3 The All-Merciful, The Ever-Merciful. 1:4t The Possessor of the Day of Doom.

1:5 You only do we worship, and You only do we beseech for help. 1:6 Guide us in the straight Path.

1:7  The Path of the ones whom You have favored, other than that of the ones against whom You are angered, and not (that of) the erring.  (It iscustomary to say “amin” “amen” at the end of this Surah).

The first verse, transliterated as “bismillāhir rahmānir rahīm”, may be familiar to non-Arabic speakers and non-Muslims because of its ubiquity in Arabic and Muslim societies. This verse appears at the start of every chapter in the Qur’an with the exception of the ninth chapter. The verse is normally said before reciting a chapter or part of a chapter during daily prayer, and also before public proclamations and indeed before many personal and everyday activities in many Arabic and Muslim societies as a way to invoke God’s blessing and proclaim one’s motives before an undertaking.
The two words “ar rahmān” and “ar rahīm” are often translated in English as “the beneficent” and “the merciful” or “the generous” and “the merciful.” They are often also translated as superlatives, for example, “the most generous” and “the most merciful”. Grammatically the two words “rahmaan” and “raheem” are different linguistic forms of the triconsonantal root R-H-M, connoting “mercy”. (For more information, see the section on root forms in Semitic languages). The form “rahmaan” denotes degree or extent, i.e., “most merciful,” while “raheem” denotes time permanence, i.e., “ever merciful”.
The second verse’s “الحمد الله” ranks as one of the most popular phrases in all of Arabic, being used to express one’s well-being, general happiness, or even consolation in a disaster (see Alhamdulillah). The verse is also significant in that it includes a relationship between the two most common names for God in Arabic “الله” and “رب”. The first word is a ubiquitous name for God, and the second roughly translates to “Lord.” It shares the same root with the Hebrew “rabbi”. In some printings of the Qur’an, both words appear in red everywhere in the Qur’an.
The reading of the first word of the fourth verse, translated as “master/king” above, has been the subject of debate. The two main recitations, of the Qur’an, Warsh and Hafs, differ on whether it should be “maliki” with a short “a,” which means “king” (Warsh, from Nafi’; Ibn Kathir; Ibn Amir; Abu ‘Amr; Hamza), or “māliki” with a long “a,” which means “master” or “owner” (Hafs, from Asim, and al-Kisa’i). Both “maliki” and “māliki” derive from the same triconsonantal root in Arabic, M-L-K. Both readings are considered valid by many practitioners, since both can be seen as describing God.
In the seventh verse, hadith inform us that “ġayril maġḍūbi ‘alayhim” (those who earned your anger) refers to the Jews, who, according to Allah, abandoned practicing his religion; “walāḍ ḍāllīn” (those who went astray) refers to the Christians, who lost the knowledge and thus deserve less anger.[1][2][3]
In some Muslim societies, Al-Fatiha is traditionally read together by a couple to seal their engagement, however this act is not recorded in the sunnah and is seen by many to be an innovation.

The first verse, transliterated as “bismillāhir rahmānir rahīm”, may be familiar to non-Arabic speakers and non-Muslims because of its ubiquity in Arabic and Muslim societies. This verse appears at the start of every chapter in the Qur’an with the exception of the ninth chapter. The verse is normally said before reciting a chapter or part of a chapter during daily prayer, and also before public proclamations and indeed before many personal and everyday activities in many Arabic and Muslim societies as a way to invoke God’s blessing and proclaim one’s motives before an undertaking.The two words “ar rahmān” and “ar rahīm” are often translated in English as “the beneficent” and “the merciful” or “the generous” and “the merciful.” They are often also translated as superlatives, for example, “the most generous” and “the most merciful”. Grammatically the two words “rahmaan” and “raheem” are different linguistic forms of the triconsonantal root R-H-M, connoting “mercy”. (For more information, see the section on root forms in Semitic languages). The form “rahmaan” denotes degree or extent, i.e., “most merciful,” while “raheem” denotes time permanence, i.e., “ever merciful”.

The second verse’s “الحمد الله” ranks as one of the most popular phrases in all of Arabic, being used to express one’s well-being, general happiness, or even consolation in a disaster (see Alhamdulillah). The verse is also significant in that it includes a relationship between the two most common names for God in Arabic “الله” and “رب”. The first word is a ubiquitous name for God, and the second roughly translates to “Lord.”

It shares the same root with the Hebrew “rabbi”. In some printings of the Qur’an, both words appear in red everywhere in the Qur’an.The reading of the first word of the fourth verse, translated as “master/king” above, has been the subject of debate. The two main recitations, of the Qur’an, Warsh and Hafs, differ on whether it should be “maliki” with a short “a,” which means “king” (Warsh, from Nafi’; Ibn Kathir; Ibn Amir; Abu ‘Amr; Hamza), or “māliki” with a long “a,” which means “master” or “owner” (Hafs, from Asim, and al-Kisa’i).

Both “maliki” and “māliki” derive from the same triconsonantal root in Arabic, M-L-K. Both readings are considered valid by many practitioners, since both can be seen as describing God.In the seventh verse, hadith inform us that “ġayril maġḍūbi ‘alayhim” (those who earned your anger) refers to the Jews, who, according to Allah, abandoned practicing his religion; “walāḍ ḍāllīn” (those who went astray) refers to the Christians, who lost the knowledge and thus deserve less anger.[1][2][3]In some Muslim societies, Al-Fatiha is traditionally read together by a couple to seal their engagement, however this act is not recorded in the sunnah and is seen by many to be an innovation.

Categories: Islam, Quran, Uncategorized
  1. khaleeq
    April 24, 2010 at 3:25 am

    Maashallah Adil Bhai! I must confratulate you while appreciating the topics you choose to post in the blog. I always look forward to your post alert as it contains tremendous amount of news, information and facts with your very apt and advises and justified opiniond. Pl keep it up Adil Bhai!

    • April 24, 2010 at 5:22 pm

      Brother, Khaleeq, it is a small, effort, with intention basically to correct my self, and to gain some knowledge to keep updated. But with the blessings and support of people like you I am encouraged to strive to make contriibution in what ever manner I could to the system we live in and to the people we share the space we live in. Thnaks for your support and encouragement…. keep thinking and keep making differecne to the people who need us most the poor and the desadvantaged in the society.

  2. A.K.MANSOOR
    April 24, 2010 at 10:33 pm

    Brother Adil Bravo! keep it up. This way you are doing the job of Tableegh which is expected from every muslim.

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